Mighty new Reefinator unleashed on the world

Mighty new Reefinator unleashed on the world With its new design the H4 Reefinator can pulverise harder rocks like basalt and it works to a depth of 450 mm. Those in the know might have been wondering how Tim Pannell could possibly improve the Reefinator, while those who have been living under a rock might just find that rock about to be crushed. Tim found a rotary rock crusher made overseas to deal with the laterites, but it was very costly to run. So, in the spirit of all good pioneers, he thought, ‘There has to be a better way’ and built his own. The Reefinator has heavy-duty tines that rip into rock, and they are followed by a ribbed roller that smashes up the pieces. Smashing rocks in situ creates more soil and ultimately it converts shallow, difficult soils into deep, crop-friendly ones.

With its new design the H4 Reefinator can pulverise harder rocks like basalt and it works to a depth of 450 mm. Paul Titus, Australian Agcontractor & Large Scale Farmer, Sept/Oct 2019 Issue 114 p. 61 Those in the know might have been wondering how Tim Pannell could possibly improve the Reefinator, while those who […]

Rock on: Reefinator aids paddock transformation

John and Shane Rathjen with a hunk of limestone rock, one of the few of its size left in the paddock at Cambrai after being reefinated. A HEALTHY barley crop is standing on a previously non-arable paddock near Cambrai thanks to a bold management decision by Millendella father and son John and Shane Rathjen. The paddocks were littered with limestone rock, some patches worse than others, which caused major headaches in their initial seeding and ploughing attempts. After a couple of years of frustration and not being able to crop the new block, the Rathjens opted to try a Reefinator - a sled with hardened tines mounted in front of a cylindrical ribbed roller that is pulled behind a tractor and designed to rip and shatter surface rock. "We had seen the Reefinator on the internet, went to a field day and spoke to a couple of guys - one who makes them over in WA and another who said we wouldn't look back," Shane said. "It has turned land into productive land because we wouldn't have been able to sow it otherwise. "If you have a wind on the harder ground, the crop blows over, whereas on this, the reefinating has allowed the root systems to go downwards and create a stronger network."

John and Shane Rathjen with a hunk of limestone rock, one of the few of its size left in the paddock at Cambrai after being reefinated. Quinton McCallum, Stock Journal, 8 Nov 2020 A HEALTHY barley crop is standing on a previously non-arable paddock near Cambrai thanks to a bold management decision by Millendella father […]

Reefinator increases crop yield on previously unproductive land

Reefinator increases crop yield on previously unproductive land "There’s nothing on the market to compare with this machine" FRUSTRATED with looking at ground that’s useless for farming because of rocks, hard pans, stumps or soil stratification? Meet the new Reefinator H4, a machine capable of transforming un-arable land into crop seedbed. Manufactured at Manjimup, in Western Australia, the Reefinator’s worth lies in its potential to increase crop yield on previously unproductive land, create soil depth, improve water retention, reduce machine wear and downtime, improve pasture growth and so lift livestock carrying capacity. That all adds up to higher land values in dollar terms. The Reefinator was designed, built and refined by Tim Pannell, who farmed at Yuna for more than 30 years before starting a contracting business using a rotary rock crusher to improve farming land throughout WA. That experience sparked the development of his own concept, the Reefinator, now produced by Tim’s company, Rocks Gone, and marketed exclusively in South Australia and Victoria by WSB Distributors.

“There’s nothing on the market to compare with this machine” Colin Taylor, Crop Gear, Aug 2020 FRUSTRATED with looking at ground that’s useless for farming because of rocks, hard pans, stumps or soil stratification? Meet the new Reefinator H4, a machine capable of transforming un-arable land into crop seedbed. Manufactured at Manjimup, in Western Australia, […]

Rocks Gone Reefinator turns unusable rocky land into profitable crops

Rocks Gone Reefinator turns unusable rocky land into profitable crops As a third-generation farmer from Chapman Valley WA, Rocks Gone founder and inventor Tim Pannell knew all too well the problems that rocky land poses for farmers The hydraulic Reefinator H4 can crush rock layers while it deep rips and prepares once useless ground for crop growing with access to deeper soil moisture and nutrients When Rocks Gone debuted its Reefinator rock crusher in 2015 it was an instant hit with Western Australian farmers looking to renovate rock-encrusted land that could not be used for cropping. “Farmers now have the very real option of increasing soil depth, which has a range of agronomic benefits including greater water and nutrient holding capacity, and greater rooting depth which also then helps with crop and pasture resilience in times of crop stress,” Tim Pannell said. The latest Reefinator has been dubbed the H4 with the H designating that it’s a hydraulically operated machine and as such, there are no shear pins on the tines.

As a third-generation farmer from Chapman Valley WA, Rocks Gone founder and inventor Tim Pannell knew all too well the problems that rocky land poses for farmers Ben Alcott, AFDJ, 30 0ct 2020 The hydraulic Reefinator H4 can crush rock layers while it deep rips and prepares once useless ground for crop growing with access […]

Stopped for rain?

Stopped for rain? Give Darren Smith a call on 0499 866 813 to arrange your private #H4Reefinator demo at North Kukerin.

Stopped for rain? Give Darren Smith a call on 0499 866 813 to arrange your private #H4Reefinator demo at North Kukerin.

A crushing start to the year at Yathroo

A crushing start to the year at Yathroo Carl Moltoni has spent the past few weeks towing his Rocks Gone Reefinator across his Yathroo property. PREPARING for the 2019 season has meant crushing rocks with a Reefinator for Yathroo farmer Carl Moltoni. "Getting into some reefinating is our next big job," Mr Moltoni said. "We purchased a reefinating machine last year after we dry hired one for a year." Mr Moltoni has since sold his spader with the proceeds going into purchasing the Reefinator. Unarable land that had surface rocks is not an issue anymore. Mr Moltoni said he had a lot of rock heaps that were piled up over the years and now they are spreading them out and crushing them into the soil. "Some ridges you have to go over eight or nine times to get them crushed," he said. "It can be very time consuming. "I tend to take as minimal rock as possible each time otherwise it's too hard on the tractor."

Carl Moltoni has spent the past few weeks towing his Rocks Gone Reefinator across his Yathroo property. Rachel Clarke, Farm Weekly, 26 Mar 2019 PREPARING for the 2019 season has meant crushing rocks with a Reefinator for Yathroo farmer Carl Moltoni. Having already completed the spreading of super on his pastures, the second-generation farmer is […]

Reefinate is a word you can bank on

Reefinate is a word you can bank on Kulin farmer Brendon Savage standing in a healthy crop of wheat growing on a ridge of typical ironstone country in a paddock characterised by under-performing crops. THERE is a new word you can add to your farming dictionary. It's 'reefinate' and I predict it will be in common use within the next three years. The word simply explains the act of crushing stones with an aptly-named Reefinator, made by Cutts Engineering, Manjimup under licence from its inventor, former Yuna farmer Tim Pannell. The Reefinator is designed to dig up common laterite rock and crush it, to create topsoil which can be sown to crop. My prediction is that even bank managers will know exactly what you are talking about when you explain to them the benefits of reefinating your unproductive country. "I told the bank manager I also wanted to buy a Reefinator because the property I wanted to buy had a lot of paddocks of ironstone ridges," Brendon said. "I told him I could bring that land back into production using the Reefinator. "So factoring in the cost of the Reefinator, the numbers stacked up for the bank.

Kulin farmer Brendon Savage standing in a healthy crop of wheat growing on a ridge of typical ironstone country in a paddock characterised by under-performing crops. Ken Wilson, Farm Weekly, 20 Sept 2016 THERE is a new word you can add to your farming dictionary. It’s ‘reefinate’ and I predict it will be in common […]

Reefinator hopes to crush trial results

Mr Manton also touched on the price of land and how reefinating allowed growers to reclaim land that wasn't very productive. "If you can convert something that's only worth $200-$300 a hectare to something that may be worth $1500/ha by spending $400/ha, the capital gain is worth while in itself," he said.

Corrigin Farm Improvement Group executive officer Veronika Crouch said she hoped for some rain to get the trial site ready for seeding as the reefinating made the ground quite fluffy. Rachel Clarke, Farm Weekly, 23 May 2019 THE Corrigin Farm Improvement Group (CFIG) has this year taken on a Reefinator trial after identifying it was […]

Reefinator hits ton with tonne of rocks

Ballidu farmer Phil Mincherton (left) and Rocks Gone founder Tim Pannell discuss the size of the rocks the Reefinator crushed into pea gravel, turning rocky outcrops into a seed bed. Mr Mincherton has seen a 1.1-2.6 tonnes a hectare wheat yield increase and a 2.3t/ha increase in barley yields. Photo: Lauren Calvin. He trialled deep ripping and rock crushing, using the Reefinator, in strips and on parts which had never grown a crop. The result was favourable with the untreated run growing 1.2-1.4 tonnes a hectare, while the Reefinated plot yielded 2.3-4t/ha of wheat, a 1.1-2.6t/ha increase. Mr Mincherton also grew crops on land that had never been able to establish growth before. In a good year his barley yielded 2.5-3t/ha, but his rocky country was lucky if it reached 1t/ha. After Reefinating, the laterite sections on his hills yielded 5t/ha while the rest of his barley in the valley yielded 2.7t/ha, due to frost. A huge percentage of the State’s farming country is covered in rocky outcrops which are often uncroppable or very low yielding, Pannell said. The Reefinator can get through those rocks, and after a few passes crush them up, incorporate the topsoil and leave a level finish

Ballidu farmer Phil Mincherton (left) and Rocks Gone founder Tim Pannell discuss the size of the rocks the Reefinator crushed into pea gravel, turning rocky outcrops into a seed bed. Mr Mincherton has seen a 1.1-2.6 tonnes a hectare wheat yield increase and a 2.3t/ha increase in barley yields. Photo: Lauren Calvin. Lauren Calvin for […]